Changes between Version 4 and Version 5 of Publications


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Apr 11, 2008, 7:22:43 PM (14 years ago)
Author:
Paul Brossier
Comment:

added Dannenberg ICMC 2007 paper

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  • Publications

    v4 v5  
    2424== Other Contributions ==
    2525
     26R. B. Dannenber, [http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rbd/papers/icmc2007iaed.pdf An Intelligent Multi-Track Audio Editor], in ''Proceedings of the 2007 International Computer Music Conference'' (ICMC 2007), Volume II, pp. 89-94, San Francisco, USA, 2007.
     27    ''Abstract'': Audio editing software allows multi-track recordings to be manipulated by moving notes, correcting pitch, and making other fine adjustments, but this is a tedious process. An "intelligent audio editor" uses a machine-readable score as a specification for the desired performance and automatically makes adjustments to note pitch, timing, and dynamic level.
     28
    2629W. You and R. B. Dannenberg. [http://ismir2007.ismir.net/proceedings/ISMIR2007_p279_you.pdf Polyphonic Music Note Onset Detection Using Semi-Supervised Learning], in ''Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Music Information Retrieval'' (ISMIR 2007), Vienna, Austria, September 23-27, 2007.
    2730    ''Abstract'': Automatic note onset detection is particularly difficult in orchestral music (and polyphonic music in general). Machine learning offers one promising approach, but it is lim- ited by the availability of labeled training data. Score-to-audio alignment, however, offers an economical way to locate onsets in recorded audio, and score data is freely available for many orchestral works in the form of standard MIDI files. Thus, large amounts of training data can be generated quickly, but it is limited by the accuracy of the alignment, which in turn is ultimately related to the problem of onset detection. Semi-supervised or bootstrapping techniques can be used to iteratively refine both onset detection functions and the data used to train the functions. We show that this approach can be used to improve and adapt a general purpose onset detection algorithm for use with orchestral music.